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Test 10: Childhood infections

  1. What are the first clinical sign in the presentation of measles?
    • A rash.
    • Mouth ulcers.
    • Fever, conjunctivitis and cough.
    • Loose stools and abdominal pain.
  2. What is the incubation period of measles?
    • 10 days until the child becomes generally ill.
    • 10 days until Koplik spots appear.
    • 2 weeks until coughing starts.
    • 3 weeks until the rash appears.
  3. What is an important complication of measles?
    • Deafness.
    • Arthritis.
    • Meningitis.
    • Pneumonia.
  4. Children with measles should all receive:
    • Vitamin A.
    • Vitamin B.
    • Vitamin C.
    • Vitamin D.
  5. Which of the following is a notifiable infection in South Africa?
    • Mumps.
    • Whooping cough.
    • Measles.
    • Chickenpox.
  6. Chickenpox may be caught by children in contact with adults suffering from:
    • Fever blisters.
    • Shingles.
    • Diarrhoea.
    • Bird flu.
  7. What is the typical feature of a chickenpox rash?
    • It is a pink, blotchy maculopapular rash.
    • It itches.
    • It is most severe on the arms and legs.
    • It only presents 4 days after the child becomes ill.
  8. Mouth ulcers may be seen with:
    • Measles.
    • Mumps.
    • Chickenpox.
    • Diphtheria.
  9. Mumps presents with:
    • A rash.
    • Generalised lymphadenopathy.
    • Tender, swollen parotid glands.
    • Enlarged liver and spleen.
  10. A complication of mumps in adolescents is:
    • Orchitis (inflammation of the testes).
    • Stridor.
    • Otitis media.
    • Cirrhosis.
  11. An important complication of severe herpes stomatitis is:
    • High fever.
    • Dehydration.
    • Jaundice.
    • Enlarged parotid glands.
  12. Severe herpes stomatitis should be managed with:
    • Acyclovir.
    • Penicillin.
    • Tetracycline.
    • Nystatin.
  13. Why should an adult with fever blisters not kiss a child?
    • It may cause measles.
    • It may cause shingles.
    • It may cause mumps.
    • It may cause herpes stomatitis.
  14. Acute viral hepatitis in children is usually due to:
    • Hepatitis A virus.
    • Hepatitis B virus.
    • HIV.
    • Ebstein-Barr virus.
  15. Infants at birth may be infected with:
    • Measles virus.
    • Varicella-zoster virus.
    • Polio virus.
    • Hepatitis B virus.
  16. Hepatitis A in children can be prevented by:
    • Avoiding contaminated blood transfusions.
    • Using clean water and good sanitation.
    • Not attending pre-schools.
    • Taking prophylactic antibiotics.
  17. Danger signs in acute hepatitis include:
    • Jaundice for a week.
    • Tender abdomen with an enlarged liver.
    • Drowsiness.
    • Loss of appetite.
  18. Tick-bite fever usually presents with:
    • A vesicular rash.
    • Severe headache.
    • Heart failure.
    • Dark urine.
  19. Tick-bite fever in older children is best treated with:
    • Penicillin.
    • Erythromycin.
    • Doxycycline.
    • Artemisinin.
  20. Acute conjunctivitis should be treated with;
    • Topical antibiotics.
    • Oral antibiotics.
    • Topical steroid drops.
    • Oral steroids.