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Test 4: Nutrition

  1. What is a child’s nutrition?
    • The child’s diet.
    • The child’s physical and mental development.
    • The child’s arm circumference.
    • The child’s weight.
  2. How are children’s nutritional state determined?
    • By measuring their height.
    • By measuring their skinfold thickness.
    • By clinically examining them.
    • By taking a careful dietary history.
  3. Which is a protein food?
    • Potatoes.
    • Beans.
    • Rice.
    • Margarine.
  4. Micronutrients include:
    • Iron.
    • Carbohydrates.
    • Fats.
    • Vegetable or fish oils.
  5. How is the clinical diagnosis of malnutrition confirmed?
    • By measuring the serum albumin concentration.
    • By plotting the child’s weight on a centile chart.
    • By taking a careful dietary history.
    • By calculating the body mass index.
  6. What is the cause of protein-energy malnutrition?
    • Too much protein.
    • Too little energy.
    • Too much protein and energy.
    • Too little protein and energy.
  7. A child has marasmus when:
    • The weight falls below the 10th centile.
    • The weight falls below the 3rd centile.
    • The child appears wasted with a weight well below the 3rd centile.
    • The child is thin and has a pigmented, scaling rash.
  8. What is a sign of kwashiorkor?
    • Oedema.
    • A rash in exposed areas.
    • Generalised lymphadenopathy.
    • Thickened wrists and ankles.
  9. What is an important complication of kwashiorkor?
    • Hypertension.
    • Hypoglycaemia.
    • Hyperkalaemia (high serum potassium).
    • Vomiting.
  10. The first step in treating severe malnutrition is:
    • Starting high protein feeds.
    • Resuscitation.
    • Giving oral iron.
    • Treating intestinal parasites.
  11. Severe infections are most common in children with:
    • Vitamin A deficiency.
    • Vitamin B deficiency.
    • Vitamin C deficiency.
    • Vitamin D deficiency.
  12. Vitamin A deficiency can result in:
    • Bleeding.
    • Deafness.
    • Blindness.
    • Delayed physical milestones.
  13. Which food is rich in vitamin A?
    • Beetroot.
    • Yellow fruit and vegetables.
    • Beans and peas.
    • Maize.
  14. A lack of niacin causes:
    • Pellagra.
    • Scurvy.
    • Rickets.
    • Anaemia.
  15. Scurvy is due to a lack of:
    • Protein.
    • Fluoride.
    • Zinc.
    • Vitamin C.
  16. Rickets usually presents with:
    • Anaemia.
    • Bone deformities.
    • Bleeding from the gums.
    • Peripheral oedema and irritability.
  17. Iodine deficiency results in:
    • Dental caries.
    • Thin, reddish hair.
    • An enlarged thyroid (goitre).
    • Poor muscle tone.
  18. Iron deficiency in children is usually due to:
    • A poor diet.
    • Delayed clamping of the umbilical cord.
    • Breastfeeding.
    • Tuberculosis.
  19. Anaemia in children is defined as a haemoglobin concentration below:
    • 11 g/dl.
    • 10 g/dl.
    • 9 g/dl.
    • 8 g/dl.
  20. Iron deficiency anaemia in children should be fully treated with oral iron for:
    • 10 days.
    • 1 month.
    • 3 months.
    • 6 months.